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Bowel health II: Fermented Foods

June 10, 2010

Tags: order, food, anti-aging, anti-bacterial, anti-fatigue, anti-inflammatory, antinutrients, bowel health, Bowel health II: Fermented Foods, buttermilk, breads - fermented, cheese - fermented, digestion, cleansing, dilled cucumbers, doenjang, fermented foods, fermenting, kefir, hangover, kimchi, minerals, miso, pao cai, pickled vegetables, pickles, probiotic, saliva, sauerkraut, soy sauce, tempeh, umeboshi plum, vitamin C, vitamins, yogurt - fermented, zha cai

Probiotic pills/capsules provide healthy bowel bacteria.

But there exists an ancient method how to provide those lactic-acid bacteria without supplements: fermented foods.

Many traditional societies have used fermented foods:

• Sauerkraut (Europe)
• Pickled vegetables like dilled cucumbers (China, Europe)
• Tempeh (fermented, pressed soy beans)(Indonesia)
• Miso (Japan)
• Kefir (Turkey, Bulgaria, Russia)
• Buttermilk (Scandinavia, India, Bulgaria)
• Soy sauce (China, Japan, Southeast Asia) (beware of unfermented cheap products!)
• Umeboshi plum (Japan)
• Natto (Japanese soybeans fermented with Bacillus subtilis)
• Pao cai (pickled cabbages) (China)
• Kimchi (pickled cabbages and other vegetables with red pepper) (Korea)
• Zha cai (pickled mustard plant with red pepper) (Southern China: Sichuan)
• Doenjang (dark bean paste) (Korea)

There are many more traditional fermented foods worldwide from fermented fish sauce to fermented breads. A big subgroup are milk products that are fermented like natural cheeses and yogurts. On the other hand, modern products like soy sauce pickled dills might not have undergone the fermentation process; the taste comes from spices and preservatives.

Like probiotics, fermented foods are good for your health. Fermenting reduces so-called antinutrients (like lectins), making foods easier to digest. Fermented foods increase saliva and digestive juices flow, and provide vitamins and minerals which have been “pre-digested” by bacteria and therefore are more easily available for the human body. Sauerkraut was traditional a source of vitamin C during the winter and fresh things were scarce. Fermented foods are thought to have anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial effects and help cleanse a system overloaded with toxins (or a hangover). They work against fatigue and aging.
Aspen eyes, by Peggy Peters

Iguazu Falls, by Xin Liu

Alexa Fleckenstein M.D. 2012, by Lolita Parker jr.

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