Jan Maher

Fiction and plays about the extraordinary lives of ordinary people

An intermittent blog

Blog Tour Guest: Gabriella Balcom

August 12, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, fiction, psychological horror fiction

Today’s guest on my page is Gabriella Balcom whose short, “Bobby—You’d Never Guess,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what she had to say about life, writing, and her story:

1. Besides writing, what is the one thing (more…)

Blog Tour Guest: Brian Paone

August 10, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, fiction, western, Two Gunslingers

Today I’d like to introduce you to author Brian Paone whose short, “Two Gunslingers,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what he had to say about life, writing, and his story:

1. Besides writing, what is one thing you couldn't (more…)

Blog Tour Guest: Sheena Robin Harris

August 7, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, fiction

Today my guest is Sheena Robin Harris whose short, “Technical Jargon,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what she had to say about life, writing, and her story:

1. Besides writing, what is one thing you couldn't live without?
My family. (more…)

Blog Tour Guest: S. Lyle Lunt

July 29, 2018

Tags: A C0ntract of Words, short fiction, Alzheimer's

Today I welcome author S. Lyle Lunt as guest. Her short “A Guy Walks into a Bar" was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what she had to say about life, writing, and her story:

1. Besides writing, what is one thing (more…)

Blog Tour Guest: Gemma Lambart

July 27, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, short fiction, suspense

Today author Gemma Lambart is my guest on my page.

Her short, “Alice’s Promise,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what she had to say about life, writing, and her story:

1. Besides writing, what is one thing you couldn't (more…)

Blog Tour Guest: Laurie Gardiner

July 21, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, short fiction

Today author Laurie Gardiner is special guest on my page. Her short, “Don’t Forget Me,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what she had to say about life, writing, and her story:

1. Besides writing, what is one thing you (more…)

Blog Tour Guest: C. E. Rickard

July 16, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, horror fiction

Today I'm hosting author C.E. Rickard whose short, “The Hangman’s House,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what she had to say about life, writing, and her story:

1. Besides writing, which is the one thing you couldn’t (more…)

Blog Tour Guest: Curtis Deeter

July 13, 2018

Tags: Words or phrases to categorize this post for the tags section

Today author Curtis Deeter is my guest. His short, “Clark the Herald Sings,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what he had to say about life, writing, and his story:

1. Besides writing, what is one thing you couldn't live without?

(more…)

Blog Tour Guest: David Williams

July 10, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, The Main Event, wrestling, crime, crime fiction

Today it is author David Williams turn to be featured here. His short, “The Main Event,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. Here is what he had to say about life, writing, and his story:

1. Besides writing, what is one thing you (more…)

Today I am my own guest!

July 6, 2018

Tags: A Contract of Words, "Dancing in the Dark", thoughts on writing

Getting stuck in an elevator with the person you're about to divorce. What's not to like?
Here are my answers to the questions authors of stories in A Contract of Words responded to. Monday there will be a new guest on my page, certifiably not me!

My short, “Dancing in the Dark,” was just published in the anthology “A Contract of Words,” which includes 28 authors from all over the world. (more…)

Selected Works

Fiction
Victor and Claire, about to be ex-spouses, find themselves stuck in an elevator on the way to meet with their attorneys. Then the lights go out.
Charlie/Charlene Bader is a heterosexual cross-dresser who struggles through the humiliating break-up of a marriage, migrates to Chicago during the Depression where s/he discovers a supportive community of cross-dressers, serves as a dentist in World War II, and ultimately ends up in a small town in Indiana, living as a woman and working as a hairdresser. Her life becomes complicated when she realizes she has fallen in love with a customer who does not know of her male identity. "Transportive" - Publishers Weekly "Deserves a place on library shelves." - Booklist Kirkus Reviews 100 Best Indies of 2017
One hot week in August 1954, in Heaven, Indiana, a baby is delivered twice: once in a barn by her grandfather, the second time to the tent door of a carnival fortune-teller by her grandmother Helen... "Once I started reading Heaven I couldn't stop reading and thinking about it…Maher's work is…richly evocative, both rooted and visionary." - Susan Koppelman "This little bit of Heaven…leaves us wanting more." - Wendy Fawthrop, Seattle Union Record
"The woman he is looking for now is the one who can call him Bob, or even Baby, without offending him. Where is she? He opens the refrigerator. Not in there. He closes the refrigerator. It’s the refrigerator they bought the day that plane blew up over Scotland. That was on the news when we brought it in and…there’s something else he is trying to remember." - See more at: http://www.persimmontree.org/v2/fall-2010/turn-turn-turn/#sthash.F1ECMbi5.dpuf
Theater
"An extraordinary assemblage of women speak about war and peace. They speak in clear and compelling language, often with song and poetry, and what they tell their audience both educates and inspires. If Most Dangerous Women were performed in schools across the country, we might well see a new generation of young people dedicated to ending the scourge of war." - Howard Zinn, Author of A People's History of the United States
Theater
MYRNA: I'll admit the knife seems real. But many dreams have a quality of intense reality about them. INTRUDER: So how do you know whether you're alone dreaming I'm holding a knife to your throat or whether I'm holding a knife to your throat while you dream of the possibility of being alone? MYRNA: The old butterfly/man dilemma. INTRUDER: The very one. MYRNA: What if we are both alone dreaming each other?

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