Pat McNees

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Cool science sites

Here are some links to cool science sites for young people:

Astro4Girls Resources (American Library Association)

Beginner's Guide to Bird Watching (Home Advisor)

The Best Way to Support Inquiry-Based Learning (Shannon McClintock Miller, Kids Discover, 10-4-16).

Beyond ‘Hidden Figures’: Nurturing New Black and Latino Math Whizzes (Amy Harmon, NY Times, 2-17-17) Check out this Week 1 Challenge Problem: Is there a 10-digit number where the first digit is equal to how many 0’s are in the number, the second digit is equal to how many 1’s are in the number, the third digit is equal to how many 2’s are in the number, all the way up to the last digit, which is equal to how many 9’s are in the number?

The Body and Medicine (Children's University of Manchester). This website on human body systems will help you learn about body systems, types of illness, and good and bad drugs. Take the quizzes and learn what you know and what you don't know.

Calculators and conversion tools (some free, some $$)

Car and vehicle science experiments (Title Pro) An unusual collection of experiments which Dakota Lowe alerted me to.

Center for Game Science

Climate change evangelist. Evangelical Christian Katharine Hayhoe tells us how her faith inspires her to spread the word about climate change. (PBS, Nova, The Secret Life of Scientists & Engineers).

Cool Science Links (CoolScience.org)

CryptoKids (National Security Agency)

Dame Stephanie Shirley: Our Women's Company (PBS, Nova, The Secret Life of Scientists & Engineers). Dame Stephanie Shirley breaks through about a million glass ceilings with her digital innovations and her all-female company.

Delights of Chemistry (Dept. of Chemistry, University of Leeds)

Discovery Channel Young Scientist Challenge (science competition for grades 5-8)

DoubleXScience the online science magazine/​blog for women, bringing science to the woman in you, whoever she is, whatever she does. Categories covered: biology, book reviews, chemistry, health, mental illness, notable women, pregnancy, physics, pregnancy 101, science education, everything else. Here's a sample: The Girls of Atomic City (book review by Chris Gunter) The unbelievable true story of young women during World War II who worked in a secret city dedicated to making fuel for the first atomic bomb—only they didn’t know that.

Disaster preparedness:
Hurricane Basics (Ready.gov, which has similar sits for other types of disaster, including active shooters, drought, explosions, landslides, pandemic, and so on)
Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country: Your Handbook for the San Francisco Bay Region (U.S. Geological Survey and many partners)
Tornado Readiness: Protection from Extreme Wind (National Wind Institute)
Flood and flash floods (Disaster Center, which has material on other kinds of disaster also).
Fire Safety (KidsHealth)
SafeStars Resources (sites on child safety, campus safety, first aid and CPR, fire protection, earthquake readiness, flood readiness, hurricane readiness, and so on--not necessarily just for kids)

Energy Companies Are Big Backers Of STEM Education (Aaron Shrank, Wyoming Public Media, 2-27-15). This lively segment about hands-on activities in the classroom made me aware of Project Lead the Way, a leading U.S. provider of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) programs, thru K-12 curriculum. See, for example, Project Gateway, which provides engineering and biomedical science curriculum for middle school students -- rigorous and relevant experiences through activity-, project-, and problem-based learning.

50 Math Lesson Plans and Resources for all Ages (Forever Curious, curating the best educational resources on the Web)

Find a Conference (Expanding Your Horizons Network, dedicated to providing gateway STEM experiences to middle and high school girls that spark interest in STEM activities and careers).

From Maker to Make-HER: STEM Exploration for Girls (Amy Carlton, American Libraries, 6-29-15) on LadyMaker workshops. See also: Make-HER (STEM exploration for mothers and daughters, at Sunnyvale Library) and Things to try at home.

40 Cool Science Experiments on the Web (Scholastic)

Fun Links for Girls (Iowa State University)

GeoGuesser (a geography game that takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings)

Getting the numbers right (about data and statistics -- one section of Science and Medical Writing (Writers and Editors site)

Girl Scouts, for Girls. Used to be "Go Tech" -- don't know how much tech is left.

Great search links (Writers and Editors)

Great websites for kids (American Library Association)
Great websites for kids in the sciences
Great websites for kids in mathematics & computers
Health Guide to the Human Body for Kids (hosted by Gentle Dental! and recommended by the kids in Mrs. Gold's class)

A Home Guide to Kitchen Science Experiments (Designer Appliances--thanks to Joan Ward's science students for this link)

Home Science Experiments – The Ultimate Guide (William Roby, Coupon Jubilee, 3-25-15)

How Stuff Works

How to Make a Simple Motor at Home (Edson Farnell, Parts Geek, Understanding Motors) How to make a small motor from common household materials, with references to several reputable sources. (Thanks to Bill Jackson's student Jason.) See also Simple Electric Motors, Stripped Down Motor (Exploratorium -- as simple as a motor gets), and Build a Simple Electric Motor! (Science Buddies)

How to spot and identify fake news (Writers and Editors site)

Human Anatomy (PhysicalTherapists.com, suggested by Kendal). The body, as only a physical therapist could so helpfully explain its parts.

The Human Body – An Anatomy Guide for Kids and Adults (SafeStars, suggested by teacher Sandra Beals). Explains the main systems of the human body -- the cardiovascular/​circulatory, digestive, endocrine, immune/​lymphatic, integumentary, muscular, nervous, respiratory, reproductive, skeletal, urinary, systems

I'm Wired for Science by Shannon McClintock, Parade Magazine via AAS, June 2005). Fifteen-year-old Shannon McClintock of San Diego, who built arches and ramps with square blocks when she was four, then lost interest in science in middle school. A science fair project (The Little Engine That Could) got her interested again, she started entering and winning competitions, and in 2004 won the grand prize in the Discovery Channel's sixth annual Young Scientist Challenge.

Interesting Nonfiction for Kids (I.N.K.). Not just science.

JetPunk. Timed quizzes on a gazillion topics ("world's best quizzes"), including
Computer nerd acronyms quiz
Name the Elements Quiz
Name the Planets Quiz
Countries of the World
GREAT SITE FOR QUIZZES TO WHILE AWAY A RAINY DAY!

Kids.gov (a safe place to learn and play, with sections for kids grade K-5 and for teens grades 6-8, and for teachers and parents)

Mrs. Anderson's Science Class (Wikispaces, DNSscience). This link is for 6th grade. Mrs. Anderson is brilliant.
7th grade
8th grade
• See especially The Price of Butter Depends on the Number of Old Maids

NASA for Students

A Nurse's Guide to the Human Body (Regis College). Fabulous site for any age, with links to further sites--thanks to Ms. Graves' students for the link!

Rock Collecting (Home Hobbies, Home Advisor--recommended by Amy Ashford's class at Kingston Schools)

Rubber, Plastic and More - Top Science Project Ideas (Polymer-Search)

Sally Ride Science Festivals

The Secret Life of Scientists & Engineers (NOVA, Facebook page, with links to many stories)

Smithsonian for Students (a place to explore, discover, and learn -- about everything art, science & nature, history & culture, people & places)

ScienceNetLinks Afterschool Resources (Geyser Riser and other experiments and activities -- plus many lessons, tools, explanations, and themed collections, for K-12 teachers and students)

The Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology

STEMWorks (more activities for kids)


Books, articles, and more

Writing or telling life stories
Everyone has a story to tell. What's keeping you from telling yours? Become a storykeeper or personal historian or find one.
Read aloud at a memorial service decades later
A loving testament, or legacy letter, sharing your life experiences and lessons with the next generation
Learn to write articles, reports, ethical wills, or life stories (memoirs and beyond).
Mom — hardworking, sassy, and full of surprises
Mutual support and discussion
Social history through the life of an ordinary Midwestern businessman.
Dancing, food, good books, and other diversions
Favorites of several book groups
What is the single lunch-bag item most hated by all children?
What heightens the caviar experience is the price of those little gray or black sturgeon eggs.
Links to dancing venues and calendars for the Washington, D.C. area.
Midlife "first dates"
Did she fall in love with the man or the waltz?
Also related: jive, hustle, hand-dancing.
All the dancing your feet can take
Choosing a school of dance
Contra, English country, international, Irish, Israeli, Scandinavian, Scottish
The big ones, with dirty stems
"A rich, varied, and highly rewarding collection," says Joyce Carol Oates
Ceilis (Irish dancing)
Medical mysteries, patient stories, and practical links
John Travolta played the boy in the movie. The real story ended far differently.
Thin little Marian had a cholesterol problem most people have never heard of.
You've probably never heard of this national research hospital and clinic. But someone you know may be able to benefit from it directly and all of us do, indirectly.
Understanding the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the debate on health care reform. Avoiding medical errors
Dying, mourning, and other inevitable events
"This remarkable collection, coming from personal experience and wide reading, will help many find the potential of growth through loss." --Dame Cicely Saunders, founder of the hospice movement
For those dying, for caregivers, and for the bereaved
Listen to samples of popular songs and music
Girls and science
Cool science sites
Best practices for teaching science--to strengthen the science workforce.
Some links and a selection
Practical matters
Identify children's learning styles and improve their ability to learn.
Six weeks to hassle-free homework.
Why parents should be concerned.
Public speaking is a craft, not an art. It can be learned.
Can you wash it if it says "dry clean"?
Fact vs. fantasy
One woman's story.
Don't focus on the fabric.
Organizational histories
A frank history of the Young Presidents' Organization.
The little lift truck that could — a story of brilliant marketing in America's heartland.
Online Shopping
Best places to shop online